12 Months of Rush: 14 Albums from Mercury era for release in 2015

All titles will be reissued on high-quality vinyl with a download card for Digital Audio version, high resolution Digital Audio releases, while three titles will also be released on Blu-ray Pure Audio.

Earlier this year, Universal Music Enterprises (UMe) kicked off its own celebration of the band’s 40th anniversary with the reissue of Rush’s self-titled 1974 debut.

In 2015, vocalist/bassist/keyboardist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson and drummer Neil Peart, who joined the band in July, 1974, shortly after the release of that first album and two weeks before the group’s inaugural U.S. tour, will see the reissue of the remaining 14 albums in their Mercury catalog in chronological order.

Starting on January 27 with Fly By Night, which will be available in high-quality vinyl with a download code for a 320kbps MP4 vinyl ripped Digital Audio album download; high resolution Digital Audio editions in DSD (2.8mHz), 192khz / 24-bit, 96kHz / 24-bit; and an additional Blu-Ray Pure Audio version with 96kHz / 24-bit 5.1 surround sound and stereo. A Farewell to Kings and Signals are the other two albums which will be reissued in Blu-Ray Pure Audio. The remaining 13 titles will be released one or two a month through the end of the year.

January

Fly by Night

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio / Blu-Ray Audio)

Fly By NightThe 1975 release of Fly By Night was the first to feature drummer Neil Peart, who also became the band’s lyricist. The singles included the title track and “Making Memories”. Fly By Night reached #113 on the Billboard chart, going platinum in both the U.S. and Canada.

Available at Amazon

February

Caress of Steel

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

Caress Of SteelThe second album to be released in 1975, the band’s third release marked their emergence into more hard prog-rock styles as opposed to the blues-based style of the group’s first two albums. Singles included “The Necromancer: Return of the Prince” and “Lakeside Park.” Although the album peaked at #148 on the Billboard charts, it has since gone gold in both the U.S. and Canada.

Available at Amazon

March

2112

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

2112The group’s fourth album, first released in 1976, proved a breakthrough, highlighted by its seven-part title suite written by Lee and Lifeson, with lyrics by Peart, recounting a dystopian story set in the year 2112. It came in at #2 on Rolling Stone’s list of “Your Favorite Prog Rock Albums of All Time.” Most Rush fans consider it the band’s definitive recording, as the album sold 3 million in the U.S., going triple-platinum.

Available at Amazon

All the World’s a Stage

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

All The World's A StageThis 1976 double-live album was recorded at Toronto’s Massey Hall June 11-13, during the band’s 2112 tour, with the title a nod to William Shakespeare. The record climbed to #40 on the U.S. Billboard chart, and going platinum in the States and Canada.

Available at Amazon

April

A Farewell to Kings

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio / Blu-Ray Audio)

A Farewell To KingsThis 1977 release, the band’s fifth studio album, was recorded at Rockfield Studios in Wales and mixed in London’s Advision Studios. It became the band’s first U.S. gold-selling album within two months of release, and went platinum. The singles included Closer to the Heart and Cinderella Man, while the album peaked at #33 on the Billboard 200 and #22 on the U.K. album charts.

Available at Amazon

May 18

Hemispheres

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

HemispheresAnother favorite of true Rush fans, this sixth studio album, released in 1978, once more explored fantasy and science fiction themes in Neil Peart’s lyrics. The final track, the ambitious nine-and-a-half minute La Villa Strangiato, was the band’s first instrumental. The album peaked at #47 on the Billboard charts, and was the group’s fourth consecutive gold album in the U.S., featuring the singles The Trees and Circumstances.

Available at Rush Backstage Club Available at Amazon

June 16

Permanent Waves

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

Permanent WavesThe seventh studio album was released on January 1, 1980, and recorded at Le Studio in Quebec, becoming the first U.S. album to go Top Five, peaking at #4 on the Billboard charts. The effort marked a transition from the band’s long, conceptual pieces into a more accessible, radio-friendly style on such rock airplay hits as “The Spirit of Radio” and “Freewill,” with the album going platinum.

Available at Rush Backstage Club

July 21

Moving Pictures

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

Moving PicturesRush’s eighth studio album, released in February, 1981, also turned out to be their biggest-selling in the U.S., rising to #3 on the Billboard charts (and #1 in Canada), as one of the first discs to receive the RIAA’s first-ever multi-platinum designation, scoring 4 million sales to date in the U.S. on the strength of classics like Limelight, Tom Sawyerâ and Vital Signs.

Available at Rush Backstage Club

Exit Stage Left

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

Exit Stage LeftReleased in August, 1981, this live album was recorded during the Moving Pictures tour at the Montreal Forum and in Glasgow Scotland, peaking in the Top 10 of the Billboard charts, buoyed by live versions of “Close to the Heart,” “Tom Sawyer” and A Passage to Bangkok.

Update: Delayed until August 14, 2015

August

Signals

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio / Blu-ray Audio)

SignalsThis September, 1982, release marked the band’s increase use of electronic instrumentation, especially sequencers and electric violin (played by Ben Mink), peaking at #10 on the Billboard charts and eventually going platinum. A total of five singles were released from the album, including “Subdivisions,” which became a live staple of their concerts, along with “New World Man,” “The Analog Kid,” “The Weapon” and “Countdown.”

September

Grace Under Pressure

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

Grace Under PressureReleased in April, 1984, the band’s tenth studio album reached #10 on the Billboard chart and went platinum. Alex Lifeson called it “the most satisfying of all our records.” It was the first album they recorded without long-time producer Terry Brown, eventually producing it themselves. The song’s themes were influenced by the growing tensions in the Cold War. The music itself continued the presence of synthesizers introduced on Signals, as well as incorporating elements of ska and reggae into their sound. Singles included “Distant Early Warning,” “The Body Electric,” “Red Sector A:” and “Afterimage.”

October

Power Windows

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

Power WindowsThis 1985 release was Rush’s 11th studio album, and the first time they worked with producer Peter Collins, who recorded the album at The Manor in the U.K., George Martin’s AIR Studios in Montserrat and Sarm East Studios in London. It was also the group’s first CD release. More keyboards and synths were introduced into the sound, with “The Big Money” and “Mystic Rhythms” made into videos for MTV. The album once more hit #10 on the Billboard 200 and eventually sold a million copies, earning platinum status. Other singles included “Territories,” “Manhattan Project” and “Marathon,” the latter two topping the U.S. Mainstream Rock airplay charts at #10 and #6, respectively.

November

Hold Your Fire

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

Hold Your FireReleased in September, 1987, Rush’s 12th studio album continues the band’s commitment to exploring new songwriting territory, with Aimee Mann contributing vocals to “Open Secrets” and “Time Stand Still,” appearing in the video for the latter. The album debuted at #13 on Billboard and eventually went gold. The other singles included “Force Ten” (#3 U.S. Mainstream Rock), “Lock and Key (#16 U.S. Mainstream Rock) and “Prime Mover.”

December

A Show of Hands

(Vinyl+Download Code / High Res Digital Audio)

The band’s third live album was released January, 1989, recorded while on tour in Birmingham, U.K., New Orleans, Phoenix and San Diego during the 1988 Hold Your Fire tour, as well as in the Meadowlands in New Jersey during the 1986 Power Windows tour. The opening track “intro” features the Three Stooges theme song, “Three Blind Mice,” a song the band used to open many of their concerts during the ‘80s. That same year, the group released a video of the same name on VHS and Laserdisc featuring the Birmingham show, while a DVD version was included as part of a 2006 box set and as a stand-alone the following year. The album reached #21 in Billboard, going gold, with the singles including “Closer to the Heart” and 12” promos of “Mission” and “Marathon.”

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  • chokfm

    This 200g remastered HD LP collection is the best gift RUSH has made to their audiophiles fans.
    I wish the same treatment with Presto and all others.
    Thank You again RUSH we really appreciate.

  • coneshb

    You got that right! It’s like Christmas every month!!

  • Donald Bell

    Will there be a possibility of the non mercury years albums coming out next year????? Would love to finally have a vinyl copy of Roll the Bones and Snakes and Arrows!!!

  • Paul Still

    Counterparts on vinyl MUST happen. That is all.

    • Frederick

      Yes, Agreed. Counterpart is the album that introduced me to Rush back in ’94. because of that it’s still one of my favourite and one I have a really big attached too. I already have the older one. Roll the bones and Presto too!

      • Paul Still

        Counterparts brought my back to Rush after an extended hiatus, and they’ve haven’t been replaced my favorite band since. The Counterparts tour was also my first Rush concert (only missed one tour since) so that’s another reason it is near and dear to my heart.

        • Frederick

          I was not a huge fan yet at that time, so I missed that tour, But I saw my one in 1997 with Test for echo, And did ot miss one your yet since!

    • Judah Rice

      THAT MUST HAPPEN! I find it THE best Rush album of all. I do love Permanent Waves, Signals, and A Farewell to Kings almost equally as much though.

    • Daniel Grimard

      where do i sign for?!?!?!? THAT was a great show too live in Montréal,Qc

    • Juan Rodriguez

      And it is along with Test For Echo, Presto and Roll the Bones!!!!

  • ElfoDelBosqueOscuro

    Please, please, release Presto, Roll The Bones, Counterparts and Test for Echo on vinyl too!! Those are the ones I’m missing and are hard to find at good prices…

    • Judah Rice

      Maybe remix or even re-record Presto and RTB though. The production sucks. Great material on them. I am still holding out to see Hand Over Fist live.

    • Rob K Music

      God yes, PRESTO!

  • Adi Shakti

    when they come to Buenos Aires – Argentina???

  • Rush Virgin

    I recently came across a platinum Rush album framed with a white on black man in star picture in the centre of the platinum album. I’m assuming that it’s from when thier Archives album went platinum. Any insight out there?

  • Keith C Stephens

    Their first album introduced me to Rush and i plaed the hell out of it learning to play drums and accomplished that goal and moved on the 2112 and that took a lot longer to learn. But Rush basicly made me a good drummer nowhere near Neil but pretty good.

  • SelfIndulgence

    I just received my copy of Hemispheres vinyl and the digital download of La Villa Strangiato has a skip at around the 2:00 mark.
    I have purchased every vinyl so far and the quality of the digital files has been very good (except for a few tracks). I’m surprised they missed this one.

    I have contacted them and hopefully this will be resolved.

    • Chauncey

      Try cleaning the record. Also play it a few times. Check the stylus if that doesn’t fix it. Tracking counterweight too.

      • Mike Gervasi

        I think he meant the digital file had a skip. Which is understandable as for SOME reason they are all being made off the vinyl source. HOW that is a good idea is beyond me. Go AAA for the record but THEN rip the record with surface noise, pops, etc into digital.

        • Rudy™

          …and LOSSY digital, at that. (They are MP3, no?) They want to give buyers the “vinyl experience” in digital form, but when the earlier albums were cut from all analog sources, having them digitized IMHO negates the purpose. BTW, the couple of preorders I’ve received so far have been almost dead quiet.

          • Steven T Ruddy

            That’s my beef too. I love buying vinyl but if everyone included HD digital download card with the vinyl record I would buy nothing else, period. I was all excited when I read in December Sound and Vision that UMe was releasing 180g remasterd vinyl with companion high res 96/24 download card. Looks like they were wrong. Bummed to say the least and won’t be purchasing anything now.

  • Justin Keery

    How on earth do we get the remastered hi res digital files? Do you really have to buy a vinyl LP for that? Aaargh?

  • Wendell Nugent

    Anybody know where the DSD version is available?

    • Starblade22

      I have been searching for the DSD versions as well and have not found anything. I asked via the contact e-mail but have not heard back. I purchased a couple of Alan Parsons albums in DSD from Acoustic Sounds and the sound is amazing! So far I have purchased the Rush 2015 re-releases in 24/192 WAV (24/48 for MP), but would buy again in DSD if I could find them.

      • Wendell Nugent

        I also bought I Robot in DSD from Acoustic Sounds. It really does sound amazing. I’m wishing they would remaster Tales of Mystery and Imagination….
        But yeah, I’ve bought a couple Rush 24/192s. They sound great, but I really wanted that DSD. So no MP in 192?

        • Starblade22

          I read something (I think somewhere on the Steve Hoffman forum) that the master for MP was early digital (and therefore they didn’t have anything near 192 capability at the time). I briefly looked at the spectral display in Audition and there is a sharp cut off above 20KHz – no residual higher frequencies above that as with a few the earlier Rush albums that I had looked at. The 24/48 MP I purchased was from HD tracks, although I did try the 24/96 AIFF from Pro Studio Masters. I suspect that PSM just upsampled it from 48 to 96 as the spectral display seems to be the same. Someone mentioned (I think on the Hoffman forum again) that they had seen MP at 24/192 on Pono, but when I looked, I just saw the 24/48 edition.

  • J Lock

    Why stop at Hold Your Fire? Test For Echo never had a vinyl release and Clockwork Angels is the worst sounding vinyl I have ever heard. Even the CD sounds better.

    • Lyle Petersen

      Because Universal Music Group is releasing these, and their rights stop at Hold Your Fire.

    • Gav Z

      CDs always sound better than vinyl. Test after test shows that (even) Red Book CIRC digital audio more faithfully reproduces the original waveform than vinyl. Vinyl is an awful lossy analogue medium, with stacks of issues. If you want a quality analogue medium, try 1 inch tape; that’s what they used in studios. Unfortunately nobody releases music on 1 inch tape!

      • Chauncey

        No

        • Gav Z

          Oh yes it does… I used to run a recording studio, and always hated the vinyl masters. Totally killed the quality we had in the studio. 1/2 inch tape is a good analogue standard, that’s what we used to master to (now we use DAT or render to hard drive). But then material would get remastered for vinyl, and it sounded terrible. When ADAT, CD and digital mastering came along, I thought at last the consumer can get close to what we hear in the studio. Vinyl is a rubbish lossy format, period. Do some research. Read about vinyl mastering.

          • supermario00

            No

          • Gav Z

            Well argued response, NOT. Pathetic, mate.

          • Gav Z

            The Vinyl playback chain can be fully analog. However, it is not
            lossless. Vinyl degrades naturally as dust accumulates and the surface
            (plural for stereo) in the groove wear. Wear is a variable problem
            across diverse issues from the amount of rest time between when the
            grooves are (re-)tracked, stylus tracking force and pitch, shape, and
            condition. There is the matter of particulates, ranging from tiny bits
            of matter up to hair and fur; these not only disrupt the sound on
            playback, the cause the stylus to exert much higher peak forces as a
            result of “tripping” over the debris. From there, playback accuracy
            contributes to loss: the linearity of the transformation between the
            stylus motion and the electrical output of the cartridge, as well as its
            frequency response, both can contribute to loss of accuracy; within the
            bounds of a good preamp and amp, there is usually little to be
            concerned with.

            As far as the media go, a CD has a great deal more room to breathe, that
            is, available dynamic range, than the best vinyl on its best day.
            Really top-notch, brand new vinyl, played back with similarly top-notch
            equipment, can deliver a signal to noise ratio of 70 dB. The CD, just a
            plain vanilla CD, delivers 96 dB. The CD (and any of its variants, like
            SACD) provide both a quieter noise floor and a great deal more available
            dynamic range.

            Vinyl is perfectly fine if you enjoy it but the constant attempt to paint the *format* as superior
            to CD is nonsense from beginning to end. There are no areas within the
            limits of human hearing where the recording and playback potential of
            the CD doesn’t cleanly exceed that of vinyl.

            That having been said, here is the most important thing about it all:
            Before this incredibly annoying and un-musical trend of compressing
            everything until you just can’t compress it no mo, Vinyl was
            consistently being produced with a very natural and very accurate
            mindset at the recording studio; quiet moments were quiet, loud moments
            were load. This is *oodles* better than listening to a highly compressed
            recording no matter *what* the recording was ultimate distributed on.
            So old vinyl can, and often does, sound better than a “modern,
            remastered” CD. But that has NOTHING to do with the inherent capabilities of either format, just lazy and fashion driven engineering.

  • Gav Z

    I got the Moving Pictures and Farewell to Kings blu-rays. They are fantastic.

  • Gav Z

    Please, please, PLEASE, release 5.1 blu-rays of Power Windows and Hold Your Fire!!! The production and mix on those records is amazing, and if they could achieve similar quality with a 5.1 mix that would be heaven!

  • chris mckenna

    Test for Echo – Was never issued on vinyl is the ONLY MUST to be made now !

  • Rob K Music

    I bought the 2112 hologram album but I otherwise already have ALL these on vinyl from when they came out. 😉 Bring on Presto, Roll The Bones and Counterparts!

  • Richard

    Does anyone know why Amazon is no longer offering pre-orders for the remaining 200g vinyl reissues? I just received Moving Pictures and currently have Exit…Stage Left on pre-order but can’t seem pre-order anything from Signals on.

    • Rudy™

      Did you ever have any luck with that? I preordered mine early on. The dates have been pushed back, but otherwise, they haven’t been cancelled or anything.

  • Davaudio

    Marketing and PR for Rush has always been able to fleece my wallet. I would expect the next phase of vinyl for Presto on is already in the works for the future. Sorry kids no college for you; but you will inherit Dad’s kick ass Rush collection!!! I have most of these albums in SACD format. It is an amazing experience; but I am hoping on vinyl there is a much warmer sound more appealing to my old ears.

  • Rudy™

    Have all of the remaining vinyl reissues been delayed? The last preorder I received was Moving Pictures. Signals is long overdue, and I believe it was pushed back to at least mid October.

    • Richard

      Everything remaining just opened up to pre-orders on Amazon about a month ago. The delivery dates are all messed up as well with all remaining releases (according to Amazon) shipping in October (Signals and Power Windows) or December (all remaining). I wouldn’t be surprised at any more delays, however.

      • Rudy™

        I wonder if it is production capacity issues at the pressing plants. The way vinyl has become popular again, the pressing plants can’t add more presses fast enough. QRP I think is pressing the Rush vinyl, and Chad (owner of QRP and Acoustic Sounds) just purchased a handful of old presses to have refurbished and put into service. And with there being such a limited supply of existing presses, there could be a supply crunch.

        • Richard

          I wouldn’t be a bit surprised. Record Store Day has helped push vinyl back into the limelight and last year seemed to be a huge amount of major label releases. Many independent labels were complaining about their pressings getting pushed back because of the attention.

  • Steven T Ruddy

    Don’t think your gonna get the HD dowmload. Here is a quote from the top of this page. will be available in high-quality vinyl with a download code for a 320kbps MP4 vinyl ripped Digital Audio album download; fwiw this is the Crap res format. not worth diddly squat.

    • Starblade22

      I found uncompressed (WAV and AIFF) and/or lossless (FLAC and ALAC) HD downloads at: HDTracks, Pro Studio Masters, Pono Music and others. The self titled through “Permanent Waves” can be found at 192kHz/24bit resolution, while “Moving Pictures” through “A Show of Hands” is at 48kHz/24bit resolution. I have not found DSD files for any of their albums other than the few on SACD from Audio Fidelity.